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Parsha Pinchas, the Three Weeks - Seeing the Good


;בס"ד

Parshat Pinchas

In this weeks learning which are based are Reb Sholom Brodt z” culled from teachings of Reb Shlomo , Rebbe Nachman and the Lubavitcher Rebbe, There are insights :

- Why do we criticise others when they do something good?

- Learning how to learn

- Seeing the good in others

With the 3 weeks starting , this is an opportunity to work on seeing the good others,

At the very opening of our Parsha Rashi explains that instead of being appreciative of Pinchas stopping the plague, the people actually ridiculed Pinchas for his zealous act.

Why do we criticize others when they do something good? Why do we look for some ulterior motive? To be sure there are many reasons. Sometimes it's because we are dissatisfied with ourselves, and we project our own flaws onto them. Instead of taking inspiration from them we put them down, saying that they are not all that good- implying that we would do a good only for pure reasons, that we are so good that we wouldn't do anything for some ulterior motive. So to make ourselves feel better for not doing what we should be doing, we ridicule those who are doing what should be done.

Sometimes we think we doing the right thing , the good thing and we met with opposition. And we are surprised. Is it me or them? So, we need to rephrase , think over our actions.

The Rabbis teach that since the Beit Hamikdash was destroyed because of 'sinat chinam', it will be rebuilt out of 'ahavat chinam' -- baseless love.

May we all be blessed to truly renew and deepen our 'achdut', oneness and unification with each other and with Hashem, and may we merit to see the reestablishment and return of the Beit Hamikdash, [which is already complete, it only needs to be brought down from heaven to earth] quickly in our days, together with the speedy arrival of Mashiach Tzidkeinu. Amen, kein yehi ratzon.

Have a wonderful Shabbos!!, B'Ahavah U'Bivracha

Sholom

Reb Shlomo taught in the name of Rebbe Nachaman:

You need to learn three lessons to be an Eved Hashem (a servant of G-d):

First, you must learn

how to walk

how to stand

you stand before Hashem in prayer

you walk before Hashem in doing the mitzvot

only one who knows how to stand can walk

only one who knows how to walk knows how to stand

The second lesson is

a man needs to learn

how to fall

and how to get up

this is very hard

but if you are b’simcha (joyous)

when you fall

Hashem teaches you

how to get up

even when you fall

you have to be full

with simcha (joy)

say “Ribbono Shel Olam – Master of the Universe!”

I know you are wanting to teach me something

you are telling me “learn how to fall, learn how to get up”

The third lesson

what to do when you have fallen

so low that you can’t get up

when you have crashed

and no one is there to help

you get up

what do you do

when you are at the end?

in the meantime

keep on singing

keep on walking

keep on standing

in the meantime

keep on loving

keep on hoping

and yearning

until suddenly

you realize that actually

“I never fell”

who could you possibly have fallen when the Echad

אחד יחיד ומיוחד

is holding you so very tight?

do you not know

Hashem is always

with you

always always

when you walk

when you stand

even when you fall.

Learning how to learn!

R’ Nachman says that Moshe Rabeinu gave us Torah twice. He gave us the whole luchot (tablets) that he brought down from the mountain, and he gave us the broken luchot (tablets) that is Torah Sh’baal peh (Oral Torah). You can’t have one without the other. This is an example of how things grew and developed as a result of being broken.

I want you to know, my friends, to learn Gemara doesn’t mean you sit and learn and you understand what is written. If you think you understand it, that is a sure sign that you didn’t understand. You first have to go through the broken tablets. Every time, you have to sit with the Gemara and be broken over it. Only then will you understand a little. You have to learn at night - you have to go through the night, because the Gemara is so much deeper.

R’ Nachman says that Moshe Rabeinu gave us Torah twice. He gave us the whole luchot (tablets) that he brought down from the mountain, and he gave us the broken luchot (tablets) that is Torah Sh’baal peh (Oral Torah). You can’t have one without the other. This is an example of how things grew and developed as a result of being broken.

I want you to know, my friends, to learn Gemara doesn’t mean you sit and learn and you understand what is written. If you think you understand it, that is a sure sign that you didn’t understand. You first have to go through the broken tablets. Every time, you have to sit with the Gemara and be broken over it. Only then will you understand a little. You have to learn at night - you have to go through the night, because the Gemara is so much deeper.

A Quick Lesson from our Holy Mothers – To Love and Yearn for Eretz Yisrael

In this week's parsha we learn of the last census that was taken by Moshe Rabbeinu. At the end of the chapter the Torah tells us:

"Among this (census) לא היה איש there was no man who had been included in the census of Moshe and Aharon the kohein, who had counted Bnei Yisroel in the wilderness of Sinai" (Pinchas26:64)

Hashem had decreed that all the men who were 20 and over would not be allowed to enter Eretz Yisrael, because, together with the spies they rebelled against going into Eretz Yisrael. When this last census was taken (Pinchas 26), with the exception of Yehoshua and Calev, all the men of the generation of the spies had died. All who were counted in this census, were the ones who would be entering the land with Joshua.

Rashi, who always reads the text very carefully notes: "However, against the women, the decree of the spies was not issued, (the decree that the spies שמגand) since they cherished the land. The men said, "let's choose a leader and return to Egypt!' while the women said, "give us possession [in the land]!" This is why the chapter of the daughters of Tzelofchad is adjacent here.'" (Rashi 26:64)

Criticizing the Good Deeds of Others

The Rebbe giving tzedakah

In this week's Parsha, Pinchas, we learn that Kozbi bat Tzur - the most beautiful of the Midianite women - the princess of Midian, was sent by the elders of Midian and by her father, Tzur, the leader of the Midianite people, to lead their women in sexually seducing the Jewish people with the intention of getting them to worship their idol, Peor.

Then we read in 25:6: And behold, a man came from among Bnei Yisroel, and brought the Midianite woman to his brethren, before the eyes of Moshe and before the eyes of the entire congregation of Yisroel, who were weeping at the entrance to the Tent of Meeting.

Pinchas, upon seeing this, zealously and passionately stepped forward and killed Zimri and Kozbi. Twenty four thousand people died in the plague. As a result of his action the plague stopped. But there were many who thought that he did not act out of pure holy interests and many accused him of having an inherited sadistic streak. And here is where our parsha begins:

Verse 10: Ad-noy spoke to Moshe saying.

Verse 11: "Pinchas, the son of Elozor, [and grand] son of Aharon the kohein, has turned My anger away from Bnei Yisroel by his vengeance for Me among them, so that I did not destroy Bnei Yisroel in My vengeance.

Verse 12: Therefore tell [him], that I give him My covenant [of] peace.

Verse 13: It shall be for him and his descendants after him a covenant of eternal kehunah because he was zealous for his G-d and made atonement for Bnei Yisroel."

Have you ever noticed that sometimes people do something good and still they are criticized? Sometimes people contribute large sums to tzedakkah and someone says they only did because they wanted their names to go on a plaque. Sometimes people study Torah and someone says they did for their own honor, etc...

At the very opening of our parsha Rashi explains that instead of being appreciative of Pinchas stopping the plague, the people actually ridiculed Pinchas for his zealous act.

25:11: Pinchas the son of Elazar, the son of Aharon the Kohen. [Rashi seeks to explain why Pinchas' lineage is stated once again when just three verses earlier it already said the same thing?]

Because the tri